Apply Online for Coastal General and Freshwater Wetlands Permits

The Division of Land Use Regulation of the NJ Dept. of Environmental Protection introduced a new service allowing property owners or their contractors to apply online for certain Coastal General and Freshwater Wetlands Permits. The DEP says applicants will get decisions on their projects within minutes following their online applications on projects to replace bulkheads with same-size bulkheads or to replace docks with man-made lagoons. It notes that applicants must have and retain a complete copy of the application and all required notices to neighbors and municipalities. For more information, go to: http://www.nj.gov/dep/landuse/news.html.

Purchasing Land? Don’t Buy Without an EA!

An Environmental Assessment (EA) performed by BEI according to EPA standards can help you make an informed business decision about property you are considering purchasing. An EA can identify any environmental contamination or other issues that you would be responsible for if you purchase the land—information that’s vital for making a sound business decision on whether or not to buy the property. For an informative article on the EA process and why it’s a vital step in the purchase-decision process, click here: http://bit.ly/1kI8haX.

2015 Was A Busy Year For NJ’s Environmental Policies

When it comes to environmental rules and regulations, new laws and tweaks to existing policies come on stream as steadily as rain in a downpour. For New Jersey, 2015 was no exception. The New Jersey Law Journal provides an informative summary of 10 of the year’s most significant developments in the state’s environmental case law (http://ow.ly/VZFeu). Have questions? Contact Brennan Environmental at 908-918-1702 to speak to one of our many environmental regulation experts.

Clean Air Boosts Brain Power

The indoor air quality of a building has a direct impact on occupants’ cognitive functioning, according to a recent study by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers found that decreasing the indoor air levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbon dioxide improves the performance of cerebral activities, including information gathering, reasoning, attention, language, and memory. More at: http://bit.ly/20Bkoqw.

Declining Acid Rain Lessens Soil Acidification — Finally!

A new research study shows that soil acidification from acid rain has begun to reverse in northeast U.S. and eastern Canada forests. Acid rain levels have been declining for decades but, until this study, led by the U.S. Geological Survey, published research had indicated that soil acidification was actually worsening. The study is good news for aquatic life and vegetation in the study area since soil acidification can deplete soil calcium reserves, which prevent the formation of aluminum—a substance that is toxic to plants and aquatic life. More at: http://bit.ly/1NXVvhG. More on the study at: http://bit.ly/1jK8rNp.